Come4.org Manifesto

come4.org is a monthly porn digest to sustain charity initiatives.

Like food, sex represents a fundamental dimension of our existence. 
Without food, one cannot survive. Without sex, no species will endure or evolve. And yet, to us food and sex are much more than mere existential, instinctual, needs.

“You are what you eat” not just because your cells requires a certain nutrients to live, but also because what you are used to, like or will eat are fundamental ingredients of your ongoing life story. 
What you ate as a child or when you are with your family; what you desire and crave; what you choose to eat or not to eat; what you think is healthy or unhealthy, tells a lot about who you are, who you were, and who you want to become. Our food choices and habits are directly tied to our personal and social identity; food is a thoroughly cultural phenomenon.

Sexual choices and imaginaries are no different, as the way in which we deal with sex is a function of who we are as individuals and societies. But more than food, sex has historically been recognized not just as a means for survival via reproduction, but also as a driver for self-expression, freedom and sometimes rebellion.

Sexual choices and imaginaries are no different, as the way in which we deal with sex is a function of who we are as individuals and societies. But more than food, sex has historically been recognized not just as a means for survival via reproduction, but also as a driver for self-expression, freedom and sometimes rebellion. 
All forms of totalitarian power–be they religious or political–have always tried to control people by controlling their sexuality: what they were allowed to desire, think, say, see, and experience. Knowledge is power, but so is sex. You are also who you (desire) to fuck.

Food and sex are inherently cultural. But while our food-culture is currently undergoing an unprecedented revolution, the same is not happening with sex.

Food and sex are inherently cultural. But while our food-culture is currently undergoing an unprecedented revolution, the same is not happening with sex. Today, people are liberating their food from both big corporations and traditions. We eat more organic, fair-trade, local food than ever before.
We explore foods from all over the world, valuing the diversity of experiences over consistency. We are more concerned than ever on what we should or should not eat to live longer, reduce animal and human suffering, or preserving the environment. Food has become so central in our life that one’s food choices have become political like never before. How we will be able to re-image and transform our food-consumption on a global scale is actually one of the greatest challenges awaiting us in the near future.

If we look at sex, however, the scenario is completely different.
Despite the Internet being one of the greatest technological innovations in history, online sex-related contents –i.e. online pornography– seem to be anything but a liberating, rebellious or even significant enterprise. 
Rather, they are all part of a seemingly unique mainstream, uni-dimensional, typified, stereotyped, biased, compartmented, exploitative, imaginary. To draw a parallel, it is as if 95% of all restaurants and eatery out there would be replaced with MacDonald’s or other similar fast-food. 
We are living in such a fast-porn era: a bulimic, unconscious, compulsory, commercially-driven time, in which the freedom of the will is reduced to the freedom of the whim

We are living in such a fast-porn era: a bulimic, unconscious, compulsory, commercially-driven time, in which the freedom of the will is reduced to the freedom of the whim

To be clear: not everything that comes with our contemporary fascination with food is positive. But it would be a mistake not to see how change here is still in part genuine and positively for good. Your disdain for the occasional vegan hipster or food-porn on Instagram is not sufficient to disprove the fact that worldwide the critical choices of millions of people are already reshaping the way in which we used to think about animal welfare. Nor we lack sporadic examples of actual resistance and creativity in online pornography. But these are still only niche-experiments, ways of confirming the status-quo rather than actual drivers of greater change

The key-difference between our contemporary food and porn culture is not one of freedom either: most people living in first-world countries are practically free to eat what they want, as they are practically free to access and consume pornography how, when and as much as they feel like. 
Rather, the main difference between the food and the porn culture is one of consciousness. We are more aware than ever of the link existing between our food-choices and our identity. That is why we are more proactive, informed, and critical about what we eat or not. By contrast, we consume more porn like never before, but we do it mostly unconsciously, uncritically, without being aware of what we are doing.

That’s why we started come4.org.
Now it’s time to change, and here we are.